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HUMANITY IN CONTEXT | Edited by Ayo Banjo

“Moving from the theme of development to African attitudes to the slave trade and finally to the role of history and myth in national integration, Humanity in Context provides a rich tapestry of issues related to the role of the African in historical perspective and development. It is a stimulating and rewarding read and I warmly recommend it.”

Ayo Bamgbose, NNOM, FNAL Foundation President, Nigerian Academy of Letters, August 2000

Nigeria's Cultural Tapestry | Edited by Moses Akinola Makinde

The theme of the Nigerian Academy of Letter’s Annual Convocation in August 15 — 17, 2013 was Nigeria’s Cultural Tapestry. The lead paper in this volume by Professor Ayodeji Olukoju is the key lecture delivered at that Convocation, at the University of Lagos, Akoka, Yaba, Lagos, on August 15, while the second lecture, under the same theme by Professor (Mrs.) Eno-Abasi Urua, was delivered at the same Convocation on August 15, 2013. The third lecture by Professor Chidi T. Maduka was delivered at the Scientific Session of the Nigerian Academy of Letters’ Annual Convocation, August 8— 10, 2012, at the University of Lagos, Akoka, Yaba, Lagos, under the theme, The Literature of the ECOWAS Region.

ANNALS OF THE NIGERIAN ACADEMY OF LETTERS | Edited by Steve Ogude

The Annals of the Nigerian Academy of Letters is a NAL publication. This is the first number and it covers selected papers from the 1999 and 2000 symposia organized by the Academy. We have also included three speeches from ceremonies of the first and second convocation and investiture ceremonies of the Academy. All these papers have a common theme: the relevance of the Humanities to all aspects of National development.
Steve E. Ogude (Editor, August 2002)

HISTORY, MORALITY AND PUBLIC ORDER | B. Olatunji Oloruntimehin, Nkeonye Otakpor, Jim I. Unah

The Papers published in this volume were selected from among the presentations made at the scientific sessions of NAL 2006 and 2007 convocations. It is hoped that other papers from those sessions will be published in future editions. The theme of the NAL Convocation in 2006 was Who is afraid of History? That of 2007 was “Morality and materialism.” Professor Oloruntimehin’s paper was presented in 2006, while Professors Otakpor and Unah presented theirs in 2007. Professor B. Olatunji Oloruntimehin, Professor of History, is Dean of Humanities at the Ajayi Crowther University, Oyo. Professor Nkeonye Otakpor is a Professor of Philosophy, University of Benin, Benin City, while Professor Jim Unah is a Professor of Philosophy, University of Lagos, Akoka, Yaba.

NIGERIA IN EVOLUTION | Edited by Moses Akinola Makinde

We have given to the lectures in this volume the theme Nigeria in Evolution. The lead lecture is on Nigeria’s Amalgamation, and the second on Northern Nigerian Renaissance, critically examining the socio-economic developments of Northern Nigeria in the 20th and 21st centuries.

ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF CITIZENSHIP | Edited by Moses Akinola Makinde

The theme of the Nigerian Academy of Letter’s Annual Convocation in August 14-15 was Ethical Dimensions of Citizenship. The lead paper in this volume by Professor Francis O. Egbokhare, FNAL was the key lecture delivered at that Convocation, at the University of Lagos, Akoka, Yaba, Lagos on August 14, 2014 while the second paper was delivered at the Scientific Session of the same Convocation by Professor Sola Akinrinade, FNAL. The third lecture by Professor Sam Ukala was delivered at the Annual Lecture at the Delta State University, Abraka on 24 March, 2015. It was originally scheduled for the usual month of mid-February. But owing to the Presidential election which was originally to hold about the same time in February and which was later postponed to 28 March, the Academy rescheduled its Annual meeting to March 24, a few days before the March 28 presidential election.

A HANDBOOK FOR NIGERIAN CREATIVE WRITERS | Edited by Dan Izevbaye, Festus Adesanoye, Dele Layiwola

The contributions in the Handbook are practical, down-to-earth, learned, but shorn of jargon, informative, and characterized by clarity and simplicity. Young writers are encouraged not to try to re-invent the wheel, but to learn from strategies and inspiration of their predecessors, old and new. Such issues as themes, narrative technique, characterization, dramatic progression, dialogue, and appropriateness of language, which many writers may be grappling with, are presented in a way that a young writer will certainly appreciate. While commending NAL on successfully carrying out the assignment given to it by the NLNG, I recommend the Handbook highly to the reading public.
Ayo Bamgbose (Foundation President, NAL)

THE HUMANITIES AND GOOD GOVERNANCE | Edited by B. Olatunji Oloruntimehin

The theme of our tenth convocation was The Humanities and Good Governance. Professor B. Olatunji Oloruntimehin presented the Convocation Lecture on Man in Society as Template of Good Governance.

Professor Moses Akin Makinde’s The Humanities and Good Governance: A Philosophical Appraisal and Professor Jide Osuntokun’s paper on The Judiciary and the sustenance of Democracy and Good Governance in Nigeria, 1999-2008 were presented at the Scientific Session of the Convocation.

The three contributions in this volume are, from their varied perspectives, concerned with demonstrating the importance of education in the humanities, the knowledge, appreciation and application of which would normally impact positively on institutions and processes of good governance.

THE WAGES OF OBSESSIVE MATERIALISM | Ayo Banjo, FNAL

THE WAGES OF OBSESSIVE MATERIALISM here presented, is the text of the NAL Convocation Lecture which Professor Ayo Banjo delivered in 2007.

Professor Ayo Banjo, FNAL, is Emeritus Professor of English, University of Ibadan, Ibadan.

REFLECTIONS ON THE HUMANITIES IN NIGERIA | Edited by B. Olatunji Oloruntimehin

This volume of the Annals of the Academy comprises a selection of the papers presented at sessions of the convocations of the Academy in 2009 and 2010. As usual the Academy at the two convocations focused on issucs that are critical to the development of the state and society in Nigeria in particular; and in Africa in general. The 2009 convocation addressed the theme of Religion and Morality in Nigeria. In 2010 the Academy shifted its attention to assessing Fifty Years of Humanistic studies in Nigeria. As out’ president remarked in his address (201 0) we believe in the vital roles of the Humanities in the pursuit of Humanistic values, that “knowledge with forever govern ignorance” and that “people who mean to be their governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives” It is our belief that the papers here presented contribute in great measure to the attainment of these goals

LANGUAGE AND GOOD GOVERNANCE | Ayo Bamgbose

LANGUAGE AND GOOD GOVERNANCE here presented, is the text of Nigerian Academy of Letters Convocation Lecture delivered by Professor Ayo Bamgbose, NNOM, FNAL in 2005. Professor Ayo Bamgbose is Emeritus Professor of Linguistics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan. He is the Foundation President of the Nigerian Academy of Letters (NAL).

Towards an African Renaissance | Edited by Steve Ogunde

Towards an African Renaissance is the second of the occasional publications of the Nigerian Academy of Letters. The volume takes its title from the Convocation Lecture delivered by Professor Adeboye Babalola, a distinguished and pioneer scholar of Yoruba Studies, at the Nigerian Institute of International Affairs (NIIA), on August 10, 2000. It is only appropriate that it should be the first paper in this volume.The second paper is the NAL lecture delivered by a member of the Academy and a Professor of Philosophy at the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, at the University of Ibadan, on March 24, 2000. The third paper is also a NAL lecture delivered by another member and a Professor of English from Abmadu Bello University, Zaria, at the University of Jos, on March 23, 2001.All three papers, in spite of differences in emphasis, address one central issue: how to integrate traditional and foreign cultural practices to create a richer and, paradoxically, a more authentic Nigerian culture.

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